Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
What makes people avoid the news? Trust, age, political leanings — but also whether their country’s press is free
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE

Search results for coronavirus

Also see results from other Nieman sites
“It is Fauci’s profession of amazement that amazes me. As well-versed as he is in the science of the coronavirus, he’s overlooking the well-established science of ‘anti-science bias,’ or science denial.”
Plus: How the Equality in Audio Pact came together, and Apple rolls out an exclusive show.
Sometimes the biggest story does not advance as quickly as journalists might hope. It is in these moments of seeming stasis that journalistic repetition can become more powerful and serve as a way to hold government accountable.
A new Pew Research Center report found Americans’ views of the media’s coronavirus performance differ substantially depending on which sources they rely on most for news about the pandemic.
“Nothing is going to be the same as before. It’s hard to think about the long term right now, but this has been a starting point to try new things.”
“The Globe’s commitment to covering the coronavirus pandemic continues unabated, as today’s paper and website make plain, but we thought a bit of a diversion might also be welcome.”
“Grownups, we have our various coping mechanisms and ways of processing this strange new reality. We have our Zoom calls and our alcohol and our memes. The kids don’t have those tools.”
“We used to say trustworthy information is important to democracy. And now we should say trustworthy local information is a matter of life and death.”