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West Coast offense: Los Angeles gets a new hub for podcasting to match WNYC Studios out east
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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton is director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, most recently at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from 10 foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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It’s getting a lot easier to build a Mac news app, the words spoken in all podcasts will soon be searchable, and Siri might soon read your news alerts straight into someone’s AirPods.
More than a dozen EU countries haven’t issued a single GDPR fine yet, and the those that have have generally been small. (Unless your name is Google.)
Another point of crossover that hints at a possible future.
Plus: Best practices for election forecasts, why people don’t vote, and the connection between media consumption and media trust.
On the care and feeding of subscribers — and what happens when the thing they originally signed up for goes away.
The Internet has made people more interested in national elections and less interested in local ones. That’s shifted resources, attention, and aspirations to the presidency.
A collection of scholars argue that digital journalism studies shouldn’t be considered a subset of journalism studies, but instead a separate field of its own. And they say they’re not just splitting hairs.
“Journalists love to deceive ourselves about how important our work is because it makes us feel better about doing sometimes morally ambiguous things.”