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Articles by John Wihbey

John Wihbey is assistant director for Journalist’s Resource at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. He is also a lecturer in journalism at Boston University. He has reported for the Star-Ledger in New Jersey and worked at WBUR-Boston, where he was a producer and digital editor for the NPR show “On Point with Tom Ashbrook.”
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Vigorous linking as an antidote to newspaper failure, who gets crowdfunded, and skepticism around the standard narrative of the Arab Spring: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
Do comment sections build a bias against expertise? Do people remember Facebook posts? How much does news drive search, and vice versa? These are some of the most noteworthy findings in academic research in 2013.
Moving from swing states to swing individuals, how your CMS affects your journalism, and the efficacy of digital activism: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
Redefining the relationship between journalist and citizen, the quandary of comfort news, and Norwegian thrash death metal: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
How men and women interact differently on Twitter, new books on digital politics, and China’s “human flesh search engine”: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
Missed mobile opportunities, measuring Craigslist’s impact, and bringing an open source philosophy to journalism : all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
The impact of paywalls, seeing a city through Instagram, and old vs. new media in the Arab Spring: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
The rise and fall of a narcotweeter, how to build an online community, and when fact-checking backfires: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
Twitter as a public diary, flipping pages vs. clicking links, and when bots do interviews: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
The arguments for smarter public support of journalism, the rise of civic engagement in social media, and the changing practices of foreign correspondents: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.