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Articles by Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis

Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis are two former journalists turned academics, now teaching and researching at Washington and Lee University (Mark) and the University of Oregon (Seth). They write the monthly RQ1 newsletter on journalism research.
Plus: What local news audiences really value, defining ‘precarious’ journalistic work, and what journalists say good newsroom leadership is.
Plus: How AI exacerbates the news industry’s reliance on Big Tech, how Elon Musk’s takeover of Twitter led to “strategic disconnection,” and why journalism educators need to talk more about hostility.
Plus: Silent corrections to stories, how viral videos draw attention to right-wing news, and journalists’ (somewhat) like-minded Twitter networks.
Plus: The “labor” of avoiding news, a study of disagreements between journalists and their bosses about objectivity, and the effects of Trump’s criticisms of Fox News.
Plus: The catalyzing effect of attacks on journalists, how journalists describe their target audiences, and new evidence of local news nonprofits’ impact.
Plus: Journalists’ perception of their own news orgs’ bias, what “impartial” actually means to audiences, and when the public might intervene in journalist harassment.
Plus: How participatory journalism became a taken-for-granted norm, how news use can help mitigate misinformation beliefs, and the limits of live fact-checking.
Plus: The trouble with journalists’ involvement in news literacy programs, soft news as a gateway to propaganda, and social media editors between news and marketing.
Plus: What people expect from podcasts as a form of journalism, improving reporting on suicide saves lives, and the important role of Google Knowledge Panels in cueing confidence in news organizations.
Plus: Exploring why women leave the news industry, the effects of opinion labels, and susceptibility to disinformation.