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Does having stronger local newspapers make people more likely to follow COVID safety guidelines? Er, not so much
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Articles by Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis

Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis are two former journalists turned academics, now teaching and researching at Washington and Lee University (Mark) and the University of Oregon (Seth). They write the monthly RQ1 newsletter on journalism research.
Plus: Sadness-based news sharing, why journalists see audiences as more conservative than they are, and journalists’ community-building on Instagram.
Plus: What the shift to social media means for local news, how journalists imagine their professional autonomy, and how right-wing protests may be legitimated by coverage.
Plus: The struggle of structuring investigative journalism, crowdsourced journalism that works, and how news audiences are addressed in J-schools.
Plus: What makes journalism truly “valuable” for people, news fatigue amid repetition, and how the movement of contributors reveals political polarization in the media.
Plus: Challenging “getting it first vs. getting it right,” data journalism for marginalized communities, and determining what news organizations cover as terrorism.
Plus: How community-centered collaborative journalism really works in a pandemic, the impact of Sinclair on national political views, and the everyday tactics that shape whether young people trust news.
“Appropriating the newspaper is tied to non-news practices which are meaningful to the actors, although they might seem trivial to some scholars.”
transparency
Plus: What audiences expect of journalists covering right-wing extremism, how people follow and avoid fear-inducing news, and a peek behind the paywall curtain at paying vs. free-trial subscribers.
Plus: The rural-urban divide in news and politics, when journalists see themselves as villains, the effect of errors on media trust, and more.
Plus: How newsrooms “pressured from the top” cover their corporate bosses, studies of the “Serial effect” in podcasting, and Facebook’s role as an infrastructure for local political information.