Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Why won’t some people pay for news?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE

Articles by Shraddha Chakradhar

Shraddha Chakradhar is Nieman Lab’s deputy editor. A science journalist by training, Shraddha most recently worked at the health news website STAT, where she wrote its award-winning daily newsletter, Morning Rounds. She has previously served as a news editor for Nature Medicine, and as a researcher for PBS’ documentary science show, NOVA.
@scchak
A new study finds that NewsGuard’s credibility ratings for news sites helped steer the most frequent consumers of misinformation towards more reliable outlets.
Male journalists face less harassment — and different types of it — but seem to see it as part of a job well done.
“It’s not simple media literacy. It’s a tough nut to crack.”
“What was so shocking to me is that all the acquisitions led to staffing changes almost immediately and an almost immediate drop in content.”
OpenMind Magazine launched just a month ago, with a goal of “tackling science controversies and deceptions.”
From headlines to familiarity with news brands, people generally not tuned into the news use six main cues to decide which stories to trust.
“I was tired of getting poked in the chest for not doing anything wrong. And it was like, ‘You know what? If you want to keep poking me in the chest, let me purchase this paper for what it’s worth.'”
“People give a pass to their like-minded friends who share misinformation.”
“This community has largely dealt with news organizations that parachute in and write stories on education without speaking to parents, or they write stories about crime without speaking to residents. “
“How can you make people discuss [information] instead of polarizing them further?” A new study offers some clues.