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Newsonomics: What was once unthinkable is quickly becoming reality in the destruction of local news
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Articles by Sarah Scire

“Up till now, Slate has provided almost all of its written work for free. But going forward, we think the way we will truly thrive is by continuing to diversify our revenue — by asking readers like you to support us more directly.”
For publishers seeing their ad revenue crater amid coronavirus, Scroll’s pitch of a paid ad-free experience sounds awfully appealing.
News products that the Journal built to highlight its election coverage to occasional readers are being repurposed for coronavirus coverage.
“I think the interesting challenge is figuring out how to balance investment in the organizations that are producing the quality journalism today with those organizations who might be emerging and able to produce several years in the future.”
Alt-weeklies’ revenues are disproportionately tied to locals gathering together in groups — at concerts, bars, restaurants, and other events and places where people stand less than six feet apart.
The newspaper hopes to broaden their audience for politics coverage with a thrice-weekly newsletter for readers who feel overwhelmed by the unending news cycle.
“There’s all different kinds of lawsuits. We’re sort of the class action of an investigative story, harnessing and channeling the power in numbers.”
“The New York Times is going to basically be a monopoly” vs. “What I actually think you’re seeing is not a winner-take-all dynamic — what you’re actually seeing is a rising-tide-lifts-all-boats dynamism.”
After a false start, the unconventional team of algorithm investigators is ready to dive deep. “I’ve heard that we are tying our hands behind our backs, but there must be a way to engage an audience without subjecting readers to a surveillance ecosystem.”