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Twitter is turning off location data on tweets — a small win for privacy but a small loss for journalists and researchers
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Articles tagged John Wihbey (12)

“While remixing the stories did not resonate every time, we did see positive results on the group of hard news stories where we altered the storytelling approach.”
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here’s their latest roundup, including research into how Twitter impacts reporters’ news judgment, how often we remember where we read something, and why Facebook makes you feel bad.
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here are what they consider 10 of the most important pieces of new research into digital and social media published in 2017.
When journalists factcheck politicians (or don’t), how to flag bad behavior on social media, and getting past slactivism: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
Predicting what goes viral, sourcing the Arab Spring, and Twitter in power vs. out of power: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
The rise and fall of a narcotweeter, how to build an online community, and when fact-checking backfires: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
The arguments for smarter public support of journalism, the rise of civic engagement in social media, and the changing practices of foreign correspondents: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
“What if news organizations confronted the reality that nearly all media will be ‘social media’ a decade hence?…What if news organizations acknowledged this — or even got out in front of it, ahead of the curve this time — and organized themselves as platforms for talent?” Nicco Mele and John Wihbey
“When you’re writing, especially journalism internationally, there is sort of a lack of cognizance around the facts that you’re not writing solely for an American audience anymore.”