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How journalists can avoid amplifying misinformation in their stories
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Articles tagged misinformation (84)

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We need new tools to ensure visual media travels in secure ways that keep us safer online. Overlays are among these tools.
In April, various right-wing media outlets created an online frenzy that attacked and firmly politicized “vaccine passports” — positioning the idea as a new political flashpoint in the pandemic culture war.
Our research found that posts that came from influencers, as well as women without enormous numbers of followers, and that cited scientists or other scholars, received more likes, comments, retweets and hashtags.
As the election recedes, medical and climate misinformation move to the forefront.
The ocean’s twilight zone is, first and foremost, a reminder that our understanding of misinformation online is severely lacking because of limited data.
We expect to see cases of an incident in one place used to support false claims of fraud in another place.
The far-right site The Gateway Pundit was by far was the most-shared fake news domain; in some months, its stories were shared almost as often as stories from The New York Times, The Washington Post, and CNN.