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Articles tagged news avoidance (16)

“No single variable is more predictive of whether someone consistently avoids news than their level of interest in politics and civic affairs.”
“A greater sense of normalcy may be good for people’s mental health, but not news profits.”
A healthy chunk of Facebook users say they don’t get much news there any more — an outcome to be both expected and desired.
Plus: How community-centered collaborative journalism really works in a pandemic, the impact of Sinclair on national political views, and the everyday tactics that shape whether young people trust news.
“Daily political events consistently evoked negative emotions [which] predicted worse day-to-day psychological and physical health, but also greater motivation to take action aimed at changing the political system that evoked the negative emotions in the first place.”
Slow news has been pitched as a way to break through the noise and reach audiences exhausted by the daily headlines. But it’s still fast-news junkies who are most attracted to it, this new research finds.
“Many people’s news habits quite sensibly depend on the news available to them, and in some cases they may have good reason to view such sources as deficient or untrustworthy.”
Audience numbers now look more like a standard busy news week than a global pandemic that’s captured the world’s attention. Coronavirus news fatigue has set in.
Data from Germany finds that Apple Podcasts users devote about 23 percent of their podcast listening to news shows — versus just 8 percent for Spotify users.