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Articles tagged polarization (11)

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Plus: Sadness-based news sharing, why journalists see audiences as more conservative than they are, and journalists’ community-building on Instagram.
“It will be a flash in the pan. Some legislators will get pissy. And then in a few weeks they will move onto something else. Meanwhile we are printing money in the basement, and we are fine.”
Shifting the focus of a newspaper’s opinion section from national (Trump! Pelosi! distant, scary!) to local (schools! development! nearby, impactful!) can reduce political polarization, a new study finds.
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here’s their latest roundup, including research into how Twitter impacts reporters’ news judgment, how often we remember where we read something, and why Facebook makes you feel bad.
And apparently without incident! “The ultimate goal is a less polarized debate and a less polarized, more open, and plural public…But we also want to raise people’s awareness of the value of joining in on the same conversation, and not splitting into different atoms.”
Plus: Facebook buys some print ads in Germany, research on the polarizing effects of social media, and sometimes it’s not fake news — it’s just good old fabrication.
We sift through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here are 10 of the most interesting studies about social and digital media published in 2015.
The impact of Do Not Track on news outlets and the complexities of filter bubbles and polarization: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.
“It remains true that the fixed costs of producing good news are still really high. It’s easy to put up a website, but to produce original reporting news content is still really expensive.”
The impact of paywalls, seeing a city through Instagram, and old vs. new media in the Arab Spring: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.