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Collaborate or die: A new initiative wants to make it easier for national and local outlets to work together
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Collaborate or die: A new initiative wants to make it easier for national and local outlets to work together
“Where you find resistance to collaboration is where you’re finding news enterprises hastening their own demise.”
By Ricardo Bilton
How NPR factchecked the first presidential debate in realtime, on top of a live transcript
More than 6 million users checked out the factcheck, sending record traffic (especially on mobile) to the site.
By Shan Wang
Hot Pod: Will the next wave of audio advertising make podcasts sound like (yuck) commercial radio?
Plus: Panoply expands to London, Midroll makes a bigger bet on live events, and Bloomberg finds audio success.
By Nicholas Quah
Jeff Israely: Five years in, our news startup is seeing the pace of change slow
“The future is already here, and we have to hustle every day to survive. And succeed.”
By Jeff Israely
This: Vox.com hires Andrew Golis as its first general manager
“He is going to be tasked with thinking about what are the big swings that we want to take in the next few years.”
By Joseph Lichterman
Slate, now 20 years old, reflects on the value of taking the long view and not chasing digital media trends
“One of the things you’ve seen across the marketplace for the last five years is a lot of companies are chasing the same kind of traffic from the same social distribution mechanisms…It’s not a recipe for producing a distinctive media brand.”
By Shan Wang
How the new director of Philly’s Institute for Journalism in New Media is approaching his job
Longtime media consultant Jim Friedlich discusses his vision for a sustainable metro newspaper.
By Joseph Lichterman
A new audio startup focuses on tailoring a playlist of short form stories that fit into a listener’s day
60dB, named for the volume at which a human speaks and founded by a former Planet Money reporter and two others with backgrounds at Netflix, is being teased as a “service for high-quality, short-form stories.”
By Shan Wang
This French startup is helping news orgs build personalized email newsletters for readers
With its algorithm, Ownpage shows readers stories based on their reading habits and what other similar users are reading.
By Joseph Lichterman
Recommended content widgets still have major disclosure and clickbait problems, says a new report
“Publishers hate these companies but make too much money from them to stop working with them.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Collaborate or die: A new initiative wants to make it easier for national and local outlets to work together
“Where you find resistance to collaboration is where you’re finding news enterprises hastening their own demise.”
By Ricardo Bilton
How NPR factchecked the first presidential debate in realtime, on top of a live transcript
More than 6 million users checked out the factcheck, sending record traffic (especially on mobile) to the site.
Hot Pod: Will the next wave of audio advertising make podcasts sound like (yuck) commercial radio?
Plus: Panoply expands to London, Midroll makes a bigger bet on live events, and Bloomberg finds audio success.
What We’re Reading
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
Why did BuzzFeed redesign its homepage?
It seems at odds with BuzzFeed’s distribution strategy that the company spent the last six months overhauling its homepage, which relaunched today. The new homepage will also be pulling double duty as an entry point for BuzzFeed’s two now separated divisions, BuzzFeed News and BuzzFeed Entertainment Group.
Broadcasting & Cable / Jon Lafayette
YouTube had nearly 2 million concurrent Clinton-Trump debate viewers
“YouTube says this breaks all political programming records for live streaming and is one of the biggest livestreams of all time. Compared to four year ago, this debate had 14 times more live viewers, five times more watch time and 4 times more peak concurrent viewers.”
Medium / Save the Chicago Reader
“Help us win the fight for the [Chicago] Reader”
“In 2012, each issue of the Reader ran from 72 to 80 pages. Now, it’s generally 44 to 48 pages.”
VentureBeat / Jordan Novet
Twitter now lets any user create and curate Moments
“Until now Moments have been editorially curated, presumably by Twitter staffers, and being included in a Moment was considered an achievement. It won’t have that effect anymore because it’s been democratized.”
Wesa / Christopher Ayers
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review will publish its last print edition on Nov. 30
“With the print edition’s departure, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette will become the only widely circulated daily newspaper left in the market. Pittsburgh has been home to at least two printed daily newspapers dating back to the mid-1800s.”
Mashable / Stan Schroeder
BlackBerry gives up on building phones
“The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners.”
Chalkbeat / Ryan Sholin
Chalkbeat opensources MORI, its impact-measurement-for-journalism tool
“MORI grew out of one of our key beliefs: Journalists can make a difference, but the ability to measure the difference we make can multiply our impact over time. If we can document how, why, when, and where we made a difference, we are more likely to repeat our success.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Shelley Hepworth, CJR
‘There’s gotta be a better way’: Ethical dilemmas surround eyewitness video
“As news sharing on social platforms gathers steam, breaking news videos shot by eyewitnesses are going viral every other week. The phenomenon raises a host of questions for publishers, platforms, and eyewitnesses themselves”
Ad Age / Jeremy Barr
Why don’t more women run media companies?
“The relative lack of female CEOs today stands out all the more because it wasn’t so long ago that historical norms seemed to have been broken: Time Inc., The New York Times Co., former Financial Times parent Pearson, NPR, the Fairchild Publications division of Condé Nast and Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia all had female CEOs in the first decade of the 2000s, and Hearst Magazines was run by Cathie Black as president from 1995 through 2010.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.