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Getting to the root of the “fake news” problem means fixing what’s broken about journalism itself
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Dec. 7, 2009, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Google search is now personalized by default, Results from Nielsen’s new tracking system are disconcerting for some, Wikipedia’s subtle redesign

The disconnect between ads and edit, in screenshot form: http://tr.im/GWlI »

“Redesign” doesn’t always mean “overhaul.” Here’s an interesting look at Wikipedia’s subtle changes. http://tr.im/GVXx »

Google search results are now personalized by default. @Dannysullivan explains why this is a big deal. http://tr.im/GUSn »

Is there a blueprint here? Print, digital, events and hyperlocal keep Manhattan Media viable. http://tr.im/GUol »

Nielsen’s new system says 8% of People.com users read the magazine last week. The old tool put that at 32%. http://tr.im/GU55 »

 
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