Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
For Western news companies looking to India, partnering with local publishers is a path in
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 24, 2013, 3:30 p.m.

“Redefining the Quote: Using the Social Web to Gauge Grassroots Sentiment in China”

Lessons from Tea Leaf Nation, a site that monitors Chinese social media to get beyond state-controlled media.

We wrote about Tea Leaf Nation a year ago. It’s a site that monitors Chinese social media as a lens into what ordinary Chinese — or at least the ordinary Chinese using social media — might be thinking. David Wertime, the site’s editor, came to Harvard’s Berkman Center to speak earlier this week about the site and how it’s evolved. The official talk summary:

In what ways is the Chinese Internet a better source for grassroots Chinese sentiment than traditional quotes and sources? In what ways is it worse? More broadly, what best practices can and should journalists use when mining social media for sentiment?

Enjoy the video.

POSTED     Jan. 24, 2013, 3:30 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
For Western news companies looking to India, partnering with local publishers is a path in
Vice is only the latest American or British publisher to seek out an Indian partner — in its case the Times Group — for reasons that combine local knowledge and legal restrictions.
Hot Pod: Are too many people skipping the ads in podcasts?
Plus: Using TV’s playbook to pitch podcasts to advertisers, moving from magazines into audio, and a Slack experiment aims to make Gimlet’s core listeners feel engaged.
The New York Times is trying to narrow the distance between reporters and analytics data
It’s building on its in-house analytics dashboard, Stela, with the goal of making audience engagement data easy to find, simple to understand, and even fun to use.