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Jan. 24, 2013, 3:30 p.m.

“Redefining the Quote: Using the Social Web to Gauge Grassroots Sentiment in China”

Lessons from Tea Leaf Nation, a site that monitors Chinese social media to get beyond state-controlled media.

We wrote about Tea Leaf Nation a year ago. It’s a site that monitors Chinese social media as a lens into what ordinary Chinese — or at least the ordinary Chinese using social media — might be thinking. David Wertime, the site’s editor, came to Harvard’s Berkman Center to speak earlier this week about the site and how it’s evolved. The official talk summary:

In what ways is the Chinese Internet a better source for grassroots Chinese sentiment than traditional quotes and sources? In what ways is it worse? More broadly, what best practices can and should journalists use when mining social media for sentiment?

Enjoy the video.

POSTED     Jan. 24, 2013, 3:30 p.m.
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