Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Patreon is helping The Asheville Blade connect directly with readers — and skip over advertisers entirely
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
June 4, 2013, 10:05 a.m.
LINK: pressthink.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 4, 2013

Jay Rosen writes about how history of the The New York Times’ paywall is being reshaped after the fact. His argument is with a quote from NYT Co. CEO Mark Thompson, speaking at Columbia’s business school graduation, about the paywall’s reception two years ago:

The consensus among the experts was that it wouldn’t work, was foolhardy in fact and not needed. People just weren’t prepared to pay for high quality content on the internet and, besides, wasn’t digital advertising enough — wouldn’t it grow until, just as with print advertising in the golden age of physical newspapers, it alone was enough to support America’s newsrooms?

Here’s Jay:

The part I put in bold is bad information. In my view it should not have been passed along by Mark Thompson to the graduates of one of the world’s leading business schools.

Jay’s post is a useful corrective. Lots of Nieman Lab material (and me) quoted in there.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Patreon is helping The Asheville Blade connect directly with readers — and skip over advertisers entirely
“I never have to consider if a story I run is going to make me take a financial hit. That lack of pressure gives us a huge amount of independence.”
ProPublica is leading a nationwide effort to document hate crimes, with local and national partners
“We’re not alone in trying to compile the numbers, and we’re not alone in trying to track all reports.”
Newsonomics: Trump may be the news industry’s greatest opportunity to build a sustainable model
Readers have finally understood that their payments for the news will actually make a difference in what they and their community know. That model needs to be extended down to states and cities.