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News aggregator Upday, a sort of Apple News counterpart for Android, expands into 16 countries
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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton is director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, most recently at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from 10 foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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Journalists see readers’ consumption decisions through the lens of quality. But that’s only a small part of what builds a connection between a news organization and an audience.
“I think I am more convinced that consolidation needs to happen (across broadcast TV, cable TV, newspaper, magazine, radio, wire service, Internet).”
“For all the progress we have made, we still have not built a digital business large enough on its own to support a newsroom that can fulfill our ambitions.” This new internal report outlines how the Times aims to improve its journalism to help do just that.
Through January 19, individual gifts up to $1,000 will be matched by the Knight Foundation — making this the best time to support the work we do every day.
The tech giant is offering opportunities for students to work with eight different journalism organizations next summer, including us. The deadline to apply is January 3.
Segregated social universes, an industry moving from red states to the coasts, and mass media’s revenue decline: The disconnect between two realities shows no sign of abating.
A shift in name (and in geotargeting on digital) is the latest step in the Times’ efforts to build a stronger paying audience outside the United States.
“It is meant as a resource for other journalists and a trove to explore for our many readers fascinated by original documents.”