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Nov. 24, 2008, 7:45 a.m.

Lab Book Club: Interview with Jeff Howe, Part 3

As part of the Lab Book Club, I interviewed Jeff Howe, author of the very interesting Crowdsourcing. We marched through the book’s chapters in an hour-long session in the Nieman Foundation’s basement; here’s the third and final chunk, about 14 minutes. This one covers chapter 8 through 11. Some of the issues we cover:

— The wisdom of Sturgeon’s Law
— Why news organizations should moderate comments on their sites
— How his UK book cover got crowdsourced
— Tim Ferris’ research to pick his book title
— Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 True Fans
— How hyperlocal fits in

My thanks to our own Ted Delaney for the shooting and editing. For more about the Lab Book Club, check here.

POSTED     Nov. 24, 2008, 7:45 a.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Lab Book Club: Jeff Howe
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