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Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
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Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.

Morning Links: November 19, 2008

— PaidContent asks if newspapers can make money online from comics.

— And here I always thought those glossy quarterly mags the Times publishers were meant to be cash cows. I guess sports dollars aren’t on the same scale as fashion dollars.

— Ex-MSNBCer Dan Abrams is starting a new firm that will provide media consulting to corporate clients. But here’s the interesting part: It will also “conduct investigative reporting for corporate clients.” It’s like hiring the Pinkertons instead of calling the police.

— Our colleagues at Stanford have changed around their annual journalism fellowships to focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. In other news, the deadlines to apply for Nieman Fellowship — which involves spending a year at Harvard studying whatever you like, plus hanging out with the charming staff of the Nieman Journalism Lab — are approaching. December 15 for non-U.S. journalists, January 31 for Americans. Old and new media are both very much welcome.

Joshua Benton is the senior writer and former director of Nieman Lab. You can reach him via email (joshua_benton@harvard.edu) or Twitter DM (@jbenton).
POSTED     Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.
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