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Newsonomics: In Memphis’ unexpected news war, The Daily Memphian’s model demands attention
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Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.

Morning Links: November 19, 2008

— PaidContent asks if newspapers can make money online from comics.

— And here I always thought those glossy quarterly mags the Times publishers were meant to be cash cows. I guess sports dollars aren’t on the same scale as fashion dollars.

— Ex-MSNBCer Dan Abrams is starting a new firm that will provide media consulting to corporate clients. But here’s the interesting part: It will also “conduct investigative reporting for corporate clients.” It’s like hiring the Pinkertons instead of calling the police.

— Our colleagues at Stanford have changed around their annual journalism fellowships to focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. In other news, the deadlines to apply for Nieman Fellowship — which involves spending a year at Harvard studying whatever you like, plus hanging out with the charming staff of the Nieman Journalism Lab — are approaching. December 15 for non-U.S. journalists, January 31 for Americans. Old and new media are both very much welcome.

POSTED     Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.
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Newsonomics: In Memphis’ unexpected news war, The Daily Memphian’s model demands attention
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