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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.

Morning Links: November 19, 2008

— PaidContent asks if newspapers can make money online from comics.

— And here I always thought those glossy quarterly mags the Times publishers were meant to be cash cows. I guess sports dollars aren’t on the same scale as fashion dollars.

— Ex-MSNBCer Dan Abrams is starting a new firm that will provide media consulting to corporate clients. But here’s the interesting part: It will also “conduct investigative reporting for corporate clients.” It’s like hiring the Pinkertons instead of calling the police.

— Our colleagues at Stanford have changed around their annual journalism fellowships to focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. In other news, the deadlines to apply for Nieman Fellowship — which involves spending a year at Harvard studying whatever you like, plus hanging out with the charming staff of the Nieman Journalism Lab — are approaching. December 15 for non-U.S. journalists, January 31 for Americans. Old and new media are both very much welcome.

POSTED     Nov. 19, 2008, 10:39 a.m.
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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
A strategy of “capturing the main professionals from the newspapers, in their respective fields of work, and thus reduce the tensions of being disturbed by the journalists every single day.” “Memory is crucial for journalism, and we are losing it.”
Focus here, not there: These are the gaps in political misinformation research
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How are paywalled news outlets preparing to serve residents in California’s mega-power shutoffs?
“If we’re going to have news that is paid for by audiences, we have to talk about the news that should never be behind paywalls.”