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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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Nov. 24, 2008, 6:51 a.m.

Morning Links: November 24, 2008

— Matt Thompson argues coverage of the 2008 campaign was the best in history. The key takeaway, though:

I’m a politics junkie who’s willing to devote untold hours to the task of tailoring my coverage to suit my information needs. For someone like me, the diversity and breadth of information on the Web is perfect. But what about all those folks who don’t have the time or the inclination to cull through 150+ blogs, numerous news sites, forum postings, status updates, etc.? Who’s editing that infostream for them? Who’s pulling these nuggets together, or pointing out where to look? As far as I can tell, no one. The task of distilling this ocean of data continues to fall to the individual.

— Adrian Monck has a worthy retort to this piece in CJR decrying “Journalism’s battle for relevance in an age of too much information.” Monck: “Attention…is not scarce. It is a constant. It’s just managed in ways that readers of the Columbia Journalism Review may find disappointing.”

— I bet some newspaper publishers wish there was a governing body like this in the U.S.: The BBC Trust has prevented the BBC from expanding local video content because doing so would bring too much competition to local newspapers that “are already under pressure.”

— College newspapers aren’t immune to the downturn.

POSTED     Nov. 24, 2008, 6:51 a.m.
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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
A strategy of “capturing the main professionals from the newspapers, in their respective fields of work, and thus reduce the tensions of being disturbed by the journalists every single day.” “Memory is crucial for journalism, and we are losing it.”
Focus here, not there: These are the gaps in political misinformation research
“Persistent debates about what constitutes ‘fake news’ and distinctions between other types of false information are mostly distracting.” Plus: A guide to covering misinformation without burning your news org or your readers, and a discussion of filter bubbles as not-really-a-thing.
How are paywalled news outlets preparing to serve residents in California’s mega-power shutoffs?
“If we’re going to have news that is paid for by audiences, we have to talk about the news that should never be behind paywalls.”