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Dec. 15, 2008, 8:59 a.m.

Free copy of ‘Blown to Bits’

In June, three smart Cantabridgians — from Harvard, MIT, and the private sector — published a book called Blown to Bits. Its subject: how the eruption of digital data about our lives impacts issues like privacy and the law. It’s doesn’t address journalism issues as directly as some other whither-the-Internet books, but it’s a good introduction for anyone looking to get in a webbier frame of mind.

On Friday, the authors released the book under a Creative Commons license — meaning they made it available for free download. (Interesting move just before Christmas, when one presumes book sales reaches their peak.) Unfortunately, they made the book available in eight separate PDFs; fortunately, the CC license also allows me to merge them all into one. Download the entire book as one PDF here.

Joshua Benton is the senior writer and former director of Nieman Lab. You can reach him via email (joshua_benton@harvard.edu) or Twitter DM (@jbenton).
POSTED     Dec. 15, 2008, 8:59 a.m.
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