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Newsonomics: What was once unthinkable is quickly becoming reality in the destruction of local news
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Dec. 4, 2008, 6:58 a.m.

Morning Links: December 4, 2008

— Andy Dickinson argues the Kindle-like device the news companies are hoping for misunderstands how people interact with a newspaper.

[T]he compelling feature of newspaper as a medium is that we are prepared to throw it away. Bin it, shred it, leave it on the bus. Whatever we do we are happy to spend money on it and then leave it…Allowing people to download the daily newspaper to an e-reader or flexible screen may feel like it gives the industry back some of the monopoly on the distribution platform it thinks it needs to survive. But in reality it flies in the face of the way we consume and discard our daily news fix.

— Adrian Holovaty wants to call his project “microlocal,” not “hyperlocal.”

— Ken Doctor argues the bailouts of the financial and auto industries will be good for newspaper classifieds. The issue is how much of the lost ad spin in those sectors will, when they return, come back to newspapers. Ken has some ideas on that front worth checking out.

— The Christian Science Monitor’s John Yemma leaves comments.

POSTED     Dec. 4, 2008, 6:58 a.m.
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