Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
March 12, 2009, 2:37 p.m.

Newspapers bucking circ declines

Sometimes the graphic is better than the story. The New York Times today features a rehash of the financial crisis facing American newspapers, but the awesome map that accompanies the story is something to ponder and bookmark. It illustrates the circulation trends at medium-sized and large newspapers, nearly all of which have lost print readers over the past three years.

But a few dots of blue on the map point to papers that have bucked the trend and increased circulation, including the Cincinnati Enquirer (buoyed by the Post’s demise), the Las Vegas Review-Journal (in the nation’s fastest-growing state), and the Deseret News (which has shifted its focus specifically to Mormon readers).

Can anyone explain the other blue spots, which appear to be in Lincoln, Neb., Fargo, N.D., and Corpus Christi, Tex.? [Thanks to Leonard Witt for noting this graphic.]

POSTED     March 12, 2009, 2:37 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
“We don’t have to turn around a whole big ship. We can try things.”
The Mississippi Free Press launched early to cover the pandemic, but aims to be in nonprofit news “for the long game”
“If you seem to be an organization that’s only concerned with large donors and large foundations, you’re probably only concerned with one type of reporting.”
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
Facebook alone works with 80 different fact-checking organizations worldwide.