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The Garrison Project wants to bridge the gap between national and local criminal justice reporting
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May 19, 2009, 9:54 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Economics of journalism, Google as “frenemy,” Bob Dylan

“Why journalists deserve low pay” — economics of journalism, brilliantly explained. With a hed to hook you http://tr.im/lOmf (via @amonck»

New York Times executive editor Bill Keller (@nytkeller) calls Google a “frenemy” http://tr.im/lPGx »

In an age of Slate and Wired.com, it’s worth asking, “What is a magazine?” http://tr.im/lNe9 »

“Why E-Books Look So Ugly” http://tr.im/lLaP »

American Internet users spend 53 minutes per week reading online newspapers http://tr.im/lL8o (PDF) »

RT @megangarber: TPM’s Josh Marshall concludes Columbia J-School commencement address with Dylan: “He not busy being born is busy dying.” »

 
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The Garrison Project wants to bridge the gap between national and local criminal justice reporting
“The story is less at [the U.S. Department of Justice] than with sheriffs and prosecutors at the local level, mostly the county level.” But how do you tell that story when local news is in decline?
Journalists are burned out. Some newsrooms are fighting back.
Keeping reporters healthy over the long term often requires both systemic and behavioral changes, and getting buy-in often isn’t easy.
Disinformation often gets blamed for swaying elections, but the research isn’t so clear
“Our belief in free will is ultimately a reason so many of us back democracy in the first place. Denying it can arguably be more damaging than a few fake news posts lurking on social media.”