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The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
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June 30, 2009, 8:33 p.m.

Links on Twitter: “Politics of Class Online,” lessons for hyperlocal news sites, optimism from Jack Shafer

“The Not-So-Hidden Politics of Class Online” http://tr.im/qlWL Facebook, MySpace and privileged spaces online, by @zephoria »

Instructive failure: Five lessons for building a hyperlocal news site — from one that’s shuttering tomorrow http://tr.im/qkPo »

You won’t miss them — that’s the point — but 37 major news sites have rolled out those new ad units http://tr.im/qir1 »

Checking in with 11 newspapers that have gone online-only http://tr.im/qits (It’s a useful list but too focused on traffic.) »

“Just because the journalism business is going to hell…doesn’t mean that journalism isn’t thriving” http://tr.im/qonF by @jackshafer »

 
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The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
“We don’t have to turn around a whole big ship. We can try things.”
The Mississippi Free Press launched early to cover the pandemic, but aims to be in nonprofit news “for the long game”
“If you seem to be an organization that’s only concerned with large donors and large foundations, you’re probably only concerned with one type of reporting.”
Publishers hope fact-checking can become a revenue stream. Right now, it’s mostly Big Tech who is buying.
Facebook alone works with 80 different fact-checking organizations worldwide.