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Postcards and laundromat visits: The Texas Tribune audience team experiments with IRL distribution
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June 16, 2009, 9:36 a.m.

Nobody goes there anymore, it’s too crowded

Like newsgroups in the early 1980s, Twitter was probably the most fun before everybody piled on. Once everyone goes there, as Yogi Berra expressed so memorably (in the utterance which headlines this post), the early adopters move on.

In the case of Twitter, as Jason Baer points out at Social Media Today, new users are moving on, as well: most of them never Tweet, never follow, and are never followed. Baer takes Twitter to task for providing a terrible new user experience. Or rather, for not providing one at all — just sign up, and then you’re on your own to figure out how to find friends, how to deal with a sub-par search function, what all the lingo and abbreviations mean, which third party add-ons to use, and so on. Baer concludes: “@ev @biz Make it easier for people who aren’t geeks to love you. Thanks. Please RT.”

POSTED     June 16, 2009, 9:36 a.m.
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