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Habit formation: How The Wall Street Journal turned user-level data into a strategy to keep subscribers coming back
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Aug. 10, 2009, 6:19 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Perez Hilton’s equivalent of a full-page ad, Talking Points Memo pre-history, my URL shortener folds

In the new equivalent of a full-page newspaper ad, sponsoring Perez Hilton for a day costs $72k http://bit.ly/BSQjc »

And in the new equivalent of a veteran journalist, Apple blogger John @Gruber is said to earn $125k/yr http://bit.ly/mtfth »

“This is only going one direction: there’s no trend toward ‘less’ data.” Q&A with designer Ben Fry http://bit.ly/4FGydI »

TIME.com managing editor on charging for content: “Who’s going to go first?…I don’t think it’s us” http://bit.ly/31Q1DB »

Josh Marshall’s first attempt at blogging (“Washington Memo”) rankled the bosses. That’s how TPM was born http://tr.im/vWsA »

Sad to see tr.im fold. How did we come to depend on URL shorteners? Well, it all goes back to 1985… http://bit.ly/n03ea »

 
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Habit formation: How The Wall Street Journal turned user-level data into a strategy to keep subscribers coming back
The Journal went on a quest to identify the user actions — an app download, an article share, repeat reading of a particular reporter’s stories — that can turn a new subscriber into a loyal one. Then it turned that knowledge into churn-reducing action.
TV is still the most common way for Americans to get local news, but fewer people are watching
Cable news is growing, local TV news is declining, and network news is roughly flat.
SmartNews has shown it can drive traffic. Can it drive subscriptions too?
“If the publisher ecosystem is healthy, then SmartNews is healthy. That’s going to be an important thrust going forward.”