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What’s with the rise of “fact-based journalism”?
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Sept. 9, 2009, 10:10 a.m.

Links on Twitter: China bans anonymous commenting, visualizing the news as a social network, in praise of dropping the potato pancake

China quietly bans anonymous comments on news sites, says real names foster “responsibility” and “civility” http://tr.im/yauZ »

(p-1)/(t+2)^1.5 or f(t,y,z)=log z+yt/45000… Oh, don’t mind me. Just calculating popularity on news sites http://tr.im/yaNv »

News Dots, which visualizes current events as a “giant social network,” is Slate’s latest aggregation tool http://tr.im/yaoB »

Truthout says it’s the first online-only news site whose journalists have unionized http://tr.im/yaC1 (HT @srubenfeld»

Blogger, who turned to YouTube after her post was ripped by the Tampa Tribune, is told check is in the mail http://tr.im/ybTu »

In praise of dropping the potato pancake http://tr.im/yaWQ I read this in the context of online journalism. »

 
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