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From shrimp Jesus to fake self-portraits, AI-generated images have become the latest form of social media spam
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Oct. 8, 2009, 7:03 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Google simplifies for local advertisers, Yahoo seeks to grow original content, what it felt like when Twitter was down

Google’s keyword auctions may scare off local advertisers, so they’re trying the old-media model: flat rate http://tr.im/B5WJ »

Head of NY Times R&D Lab explores demand-side advertising http://tr.im/B8pl I understand about half; the rest is my homework. »

Yahoo VP says 10% of their content is original, 80% aggregated, 10% links. They’re growing that first slice http://tr.im/B5Rb »

42% of TV station managers “don’t know” if their website is making money (31% say it is) http://tr.im/B5LL »

What it felt like when Twitter was down http://twitpic.com/jv1c7 (Incidentally, that’s the hallway outside Twitter HQ.) »

 
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From shrimp Jesus to fake self-portraits, AI-generated images have become the latest form of social media spam
Within days of visiting the pages — and without commenting on, liking, or following any of the material — Facebook’s algorithm recommended reams of other AI-generated content.
What journalists and independent creators can learn from each other
“The question is not about the topics but how you approach the topics.”
Deepfake detection improves when using algorithms that are more aware of demographic diversity
“Our research addresses deepfake detection algorithms’ fairness, rather than just attempting to balance the data. It offers a new approach to algorithm design that considers demographic fairness as a core aspect.”