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The enduring allure of conspiracies
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Oct. 28, 2009, 6:43 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Newsday.com goes behind a paywall, Politico’s owner preps DC local news site, Conde Nast’s admittedly lagging websites

Today http://www.newsday.com went behind a paywall. Unlike WSJ, they’re not letting Google users through for free. »

Newspapers in Cleveland, DC, Phoenix, and Albany have just as many investigative reporters as before cuts http://tr.im/DmiG »

Memo confirms it: Politico’s owner launching DC local news site, run by @jimbradysp, with 50 staffers http://tr.im/DnG8 »

Quick video: @davewiner on what happens to media and the real-time web after Twitter http://tr.im/DmZc »

Details staffers say their website is “very 1999.” At GQ.com, an editor says, “We’re very 2002 right now” http://tr.im/Dli0 »

 
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The enduring allure of conspiracies
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