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Who needs deepfakes? Simple out-of-context photos can be a powerfully low-tech form of misinformation
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Dec. 7, 2009, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Google search is now personalized by default, Results from Nielsen’s new tracking system are disconcerting for some, Wikipedia’s subtle redesign

The disconnect between ads and edit, in screenshot form: http://tr.im/GWlI »

“Redesign” doesn’t always mean “overhaul.” Here’s an interesting look at Wikipedia’s subtle changes. http://tr.im/GVXx »

Google search results are now personalized by default. @Dannysullivan explains why this is a big deal. http://tr.im/GUSn »

Is there a blueprint here? Print, digital, events and hyperlocal keep Manhattan Media viable. http://tr.im/GUol »

Nielsen’s new system says 8% of People.com users read the magazine last week. The old tool put that at 32%. http://tr.im/GU55 »

 
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Who needs deepfakes? Simple out-of-context photos can be a powerfully low-tech form of misinformation
A bogus headline seems both more true and more familiar to people when it’s accompanied by a photo of any kind.
Newsonomics: In Memphis’ unexpected news war, The Daily Memphian’s model demands attention
It’s generated controversy over its fundraising, its paywall, and its staffing. But it’s also about as close as a major American city has gotten to a digital news site that can go toe-to-toe with the local daily newspaper.
The New Yorker’s new weekly newsletter on climate change will try to break through the daily noise
“Climate is one of those big, overarching topics that feels essential to understand and also very overwhelming. The newsletter form seems like the right way to approach it because it narrows the focus.”