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Researchers ask: Does enforcing civility stifle online debate?
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Jan. 5, 2010, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: ESPN invests in 3D, “view through” as an advertising measurement, followers and readers aren’t the same

In the now-standard redesign post, USA Today says its new home page will load 25-35% faster. http://j.mp/8KJ5DT »

1 million followers doesn’t equal 1 million readers. @anildash challenges Twitter follower numbers. http://j.mp/5lS3pV »

Click through, meet “view through.” Interesting look at the hard-to-track aspects of online advertising: http://j.mp/86I6w6 »

To broadcast in both HD and 3D, ESPN will need two production crews and two sets of announcers. http://j.mp/8mXeMs »

Business blogs get 12x more subscribers through email than RSS, says @hubspot. http://j.mp/5S4rLS »

 
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Researchers ask: Does enforcing civility stifle online debate?
Some social scientists argue that civility is a poor metric by which to judge the quality of an online debate.
What I learned in my second year on Substack
“I truly wish every reporter could have the experience of getting a raise on the same day they produced something of value to their readers.”
U.S. politicians tweet much more misinformation than those in the U.K. and Germany
“We also found systematic differences between the parties in the U.S., where Republican politicians were found to share untrustworthy websites more than nine times as often as Democratic politicians.”