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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
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Jan. 4, 2010, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: The 1994 version of a tablet computer, Financial Times adds 18k paying customers in ’09, Facebook claims No. 1 for 1 day

For 364 days in ’09, Google.com was the most popular page in the U.S. Facebook.com claimed No. 1 on 12/25. http://j.mp/8OSPFN »

An Illinois newspaper had a three-day “cooling off” period for website comments. http://j.mp/5lhFTP »

Behold the newspaper tablet, circa 1994. http://j.mp/6xlGz4 (Don’t lose that stylus!) »

In-person is lucrative: For the first time since ’02, movie theater receipts beat home viewing revenue. http://j.mp/5z1jmK »

In ’09, the Financial Times added more than 18k readers who pay for print or web content. http://j.mp/63NDn0 »

 
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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
Genius (née Rap Genius) wanted to “annotate the world” and give your content a giant comment section you can’t control. Now it can’t pay back its investors.
This study shows how people reason their way through echo chambers — and what might guide them out
“You really don’t know whether this person making a good-sounding argument is really smart, is really educated, or whether they’re just reading off something that they read on Twitter.”
Misinformation is a global problem. One of the solutions might work across continents too.
Plus: What Africa’s top fact-checkers are doing to combat false beliefs about Covid-19.