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The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
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April 26, 2010, 7:02 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Police look into Gizmodo iPhone scoop, Facebook privacy settings change, Tribune local project draws an audience

After a trip through bankruptcy court, The Washington Blade to resume publishinghttp://j.mp/aVUD2o »

Tribune’s local blogger project in Chicago has already found an audience, with 15 million pageviews in March http://j.mp/cmYYtY »

The 5 lowest income states have the greatest broadband competition, the 5 highest income states have the least http://j.mp/9g7fJU »

NYT looks for possible content agreements with local papers, as it prepares for clash with WSJ over local edition http://j.mp/92xudn »

Not interested in letting Pandora see your music tastes? Mashable walks you through new Facebook privacy settings http://j.mp/afOUCH »

Gizmodo’s big iPhone scoop looks to have turned into a criminal investigation, Cnet reports http://j.mp/bLQkgj »

 
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The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
“In one week in March, maybe two, the ground fell out from under live events.”
Here’s (exactly) how we organized one of the largest virtual U.S. journalism events to date
Once we announced we would host in place instead of in person, registrations shot through the roof; we ended up with just under 750 registrations by the time the conference began. Typically, the summit attracts 150 to 175 people.
Aiming for novelty in coronavirus coverage, journalists end up sensationalizing the trivial and untrue
Sometimes the biggest story does not advance as quickly as journalists might hope. It is in these moments of seeming stasis that journalistic repetition can become more powerful and serve as a way to hold government accountable.