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Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
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April 26, 2010, 7:02 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Police look into Gizmodo iPhone scoop, Facebook privacy settings change, Tribune local project draws an audience

After a trip through bankruptcy court, The Washington Blade to resume publishinghttp://j.mp/aVUD2o »

Tribune’s local blogger project in Chicago has already found an audience, with 15 million pageviews in March http://j.mp/cmYYtY »

The 5 lowest income states have the greatest broadband competition, the 5 highest income states have the least http://j.mp/9g7fJU »

NYT looks for possible content agreements with local papers, as it prepares for clash with WSJ over local edition http://j.mp/92xudn »

Not interested in letting Pandora see your music tastes? Mashable walks you through new Facebook privacy settings http://j.mp/afOUCH »

Gizmodo’s big iPhone scoop looks to have turned into a criminal investigation, Cnet reports http://j.mp/bLQkgj »

 
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Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
With higher education at the crossroads of the culture war, public media is vulnerable to growing political interference over its operations.
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