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May 27, 2010, 10 a.m.

John Hagel: Serendipty structures and the power of “pull”

Every week, our friends at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society invite academics and other thinkers to discuss their work over lunch. Thankfully for us, they record the sessions. This week, we’re passing along some of the talks that are most relevant to the future of news.

Today’s video: John Hagel III. In The Power of Pull, Hagel — along with co-authors John Seely Brown and Lang Davison — distinguishes push (properly forecasting demand for goods or services and acting accordingly) from pull (which Harvard Business Review summarizes as an individual with “access to knowledge flows” taking advantage of “porous boundaries and serendipitous interactions” to occupy “new creative spaces to achieve a novel order of performance”). David Weinberger interviewed Hagel as part of his Web of Ideas series of conversations on the nature of information.

POSTED     May 27, 2010, 10 a.m.
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