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“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
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May 25, 2010, 5:22 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Comcast to debut social networking site, Twitter to block paid tweets, SF Chronicle to begin using Demand Media content

The SF and Houston Chronicles will soon feature content from Demand Media http://j.mp/ba1rWx »

“This simple color-coding system translated a labyrinth of…research into something that everyone could understand” http://j.mp/9eq0A5 »

The perils of pageview journalism http://j.mp/bint88 »

[Insert ‘women are chatty!’ comment here]: Analysis says women send 12% more tweets than men do http://j.mp/cI6m2G »

Twitter says it will block “paid tweets” from entering timelines via API http://j.mp/bnA6pj »

Publish2 wants to disrupt the Associated Press with an online news exchange http://j.mp/cD74Db »

In 2009, Google generated a total of $54 billion in U.S. economic activity http://j.mp/cXTd1M »

Comcast to debut social networking site for TV viewers (via @iwantmedia) http://j.mp/bhIp5a »

Newspaper websites in top 25 markets had 2 billion pageviews this April–a new record http://j.mp/cPBsn9 »

 
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“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
“Daily political events consistently evoked negative emotions [which] predicted worse day-to-day psychological and physical health, but also greater motivation to take action aimed at changing the political system that evoked the negative emotions in the first place.”
Digital-only newsrooms are in the firing line as Australian news law grinds toward reality
Lifestyle and youth publishers that source the majority of their traffic from Facebook face closure, while traditional media players that campaigned for the laws look set to be the relative winners.
Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?
“Conspiracies are flourishing with virtually no response from credible Spanish-language media outlets.”