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The Garrison Project wants to bridge the gap between national and local criminal justice reporting
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Aug. 3, 2010, 5:57 p.m.

Links on Twitter: E-book sales grow, CJR reporter struggles with funder conflict, NPR releases Facebook data

62.2% of its Facebook fans don’t want to see friends’ recommendations when they visit NPR.org http://j.mp/d8r9p7 »

Public service announcement: @mashable is looking for a Community Assistanthttp://j.mp/9XJwRD »

The dilemma of sponsored reporting: CJR reporter funded by Pete Peterson wrestles with covering his influence http://j.mp/bDhSr8 »

Former Gawker editor Elizabeth Spiers, well known for launching sites for others, is thinking about her own http://j.mp/cUl8Qt »

To spread its impact, @CaliforniaWatch has teamed up with 70+ media partners. More intriguing stats: http://j.mp/aDRfAk »

E-book sales grew 163% from 2009 to 2010; as a category, their market shared jumped from 2.5% to 8.5% http://j.mp/bKUGEj »

 
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The Garrison Project wants to bridge the gap between national and local criminal justice reporting
“The story is less at [the U.S. Department of Justice] than with sheriffs and prosecutors at the local level, mostly the county level.” But how do you tell that story when local news is in decline?
Journalists are burned out. Some newsrooms are fighting back.
Keeping reporters healthy over the long term often requires both systemic and behavioral changes, and getting buy-in often isn’t easy.
Disinformation often gets blamed for swaying elections, but the research isn’t so clear
“Our belief in free will is ultimately a reason so many of us back democracy in the first place. Denying it can arguably be more damaging than a few fake news posts lurking on social media.”