Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
As local news outlets shift to subscription, they wonder: What should Facebook’s role be?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 27, 2010, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: USA Today shifts focus to digital, Harvard Biz Review on catalyzing engagement, CDO explanation for the rest of us

A CDO explanation for the rest of us. Al Granberg comic strip is worth 4,000 words http://nie.mn/dkfuTq »

Social networking among Internet users ages 50 and older nearly doubled between April ’09 and May ’10—from 22% to 42% http://nie.mn/bFzugK »

Choose your size: @ProPublica‘s big new story comes in small http://nie.mn/dkfuTq, medium http://nie.mn/c4MMxQ, large http://nie.mn/dokeIs »

For a reminder of on why Web distribution has such potential, check out what it takes to make the FT print edition http://nie.mn/9i5TAi »

“Be nice,” “Say yes”…and more advice on personal brand-building from @10000words http://nie.mn/choQV1 »

PRI announces an “Innovator-in-Residence” program http://nie.mn/bbdqyn (via @beyondbroadcast»

Relevance, resonance, significance: Harvard Business Review on social media and catalyzing engagement http://nie.mn/a47Uil »

In today’s shakeup, USA Today will shift its focus to mobile, foster business/editorial collaboration http://nie.mn/9IGy4R »

 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
As local news outlets shift to subscription, they wonder: What should Facebook’s role be?
“Look, I know you got that Facebook comment, but it’s the vocal minority. There’s a silent majority who are actually paying for our work.”
The new folks in town are an untapped audience for local news (even if they don’t stay forever)
“I started to recognize the value of local news as a journalist, yet spent no time on it as a local resident of Washington, D.C.”
Nonprofit news organizations are becoming more diverse, but they still lag behind the communities they cover
More than half of all nonprofit outlets have either no people of color or “only a small percentage” within their ranks. The vast majority — more than two-thirds — do not have a single person of color in leadership at the executive level.