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Why won’t some people pay for news?
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Sept. 23, 2010, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Twitter to launch an analytics dashboard, Journal Register partners with Outside.in, Block by Block conference streaming live

Some neat graphics on the state of the blogosphere http://j.mp/d5qqxg

Couldn’t make the Block by Block conference in Chicago? Catch it streaming live http://j.mp/cTFu6J

Hearst puts some skin in the game, offers “financial rewards” for employees whose ideas go into development http://j.mp/bord09

Huffington on Downie slam: “We need to stop pretending that we can somehow hop into a journalistic Way Back Machine” http://j.mp/bdGoaP

Facebook signed on to Nielsen experiment meant to improve data given to online advertisers http://j.mp/9JCTWJ

Journal Register teams up with Outside.in to launch a Philly-centric portal http://j.mp/cdmusO

Len Downie says HuffPo draws traffic from “titillating gossip and sex” http://j.mp/9VZJp9

Forbes gets a Facelift http://nie.mn/bI2nwI

Twitter will launch a real-time analytics dashboard later this year http://nie.mn/bmUplR

 
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