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Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
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Dec. 7, 2010, 1 p.m.

Our first annual Lab reader poll: Tell us what 2011 will bring for the news

I like to think of our readers as our greatest resource; it’s almost alarming how many brilliant, nerdy, forward-thinking, occasionally-combative-but-usually-generous people we are lucky enough to have in our audience. So we’d like to pick your giant collective brain.

With 2011 coming around the corner, we thought it would be fun to ask you what you saw coming in the new year. Below are 25 questions that ask what the world looks like inside your crystal ball. We’ll add up your answers and report the results in a few days. Then, in a year, we’ll report back on what really happened. (Accountability journalism!) Fill out your answers below and hit submit. [Update, Dec. 19: Thanks for your responses. We’ll post the results soon. —Josh]

POSTED     Dec. 7, 2010, 1 p.m.
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