Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Dec. 7, 2010, 1 p.m.

Our first annual Lab reader poll: Tell us what 2011 will bring for the news

I like to think of our readers as our greatest resource; it’s almost alarming how many brilliant, nerdy, forward-thinking, occasionally-combative-but-usually-generous people we are lucky enough to have in our audience. So we’d like to pick your giant collective brain.

With 2011 coming around the corner, we thought it would be fun to ask you what you saw coming in the new year. Below are 25 questions that ask what the world looks like inside your crystal ball. We’ll add up your answers and report the results in a few days. Then, in a year, we’ll report back on what really happened. (Accountability journalism!) Fill out your answers below and hit submit. [Update, Dec. 19: Thanks for your responses. We’ll post the results soon. —Josh]

POSTED     Dec. 7, 2010, 1 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
With higher education at the crossroads of the culture war, public media is vulnerable to growing political interference over its operations.
The view from here: Rethinking what local news can and should be
“Your newsroom should match the community. It’s the easiest thing to say, it’s very difficult to do.”
These competitors joined forces to allow readers to use a single login across their news sites
OneLog brings together some of the largest and most trusted Swiss media companies. Their single sign-on solution will reach 2 million active accounts in 2022 — representing one in four inhabitants in the country.