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Dec. 16, 2010, 2 p.m.

Technology makes secrets easier to hide, easier to find: AP’s Kathleen Carroll on secrecy in journalism

We’re in the middle of our day-long conference on the role of secrecy in journalism (and of journalism in secrecy, to think of it). Bill Keller’s currently at the podium; check the livestream and liveblogs for more.

But if you can’t make the livestream (or be here in Cambridge), we’ll be posting full video of each session. Here’s the first one: Kathleen Carroll, executive editor of the Associated Press, who gave the opening keynote address. And here is the archived liveblog if you want to follow along in text form. Watch this space over the next few days for videos of the four additional sessions.

POSTED     Dec. 16, 2010, 2 p.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Secrecy and Journalism
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