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Feb. 7, 2011, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Reconciling Patch and Huffpo, Audioboo looks for media partners and Flipboard vs. The Daily

The breakfast test: How does The Daily stack up against Flipboard? http://nie.mn/dFHkCM »

Twitter & Facebook "do a very good job of filtering out the fake news" http://nie.mn/eN4UnT »

Readability and Instapaper team up to make reading later pay just a little http://nie.mn/gSWhQA »

How exactly will HuffPo’s sensibility match with the mission of Patch.com sites? http://nie.mn/gyJkOx »

How @WestWingReport gets the most out of Twitter and White House reporting http://nie.mn/eardrt »

DocumentCloud in action: How PBS NewsHour, WNYC and The Washington Post use DocumentCloud http://nie.mn/e5SfMH »

My Boss is a Robot: It’s only a matter of time before the machines take over journalism http://nie.mn/fK2sRU »

Testing curation: An eye tracking survey on how well curation works on NYT topic pages http://nie.mn/e10OIp »

NewsBeast has the writers, but do they have the web team to succeed? http://nie.mn/hvlrAe »

"PDF is to e-publishing what the steam locomotive is to the high-speed train" http://nie.mn/i1RxYa »

Report: Yahoo is developing its own Flipboard-esque app http://nie.mn/eSg02e »

Audioboo plans to partner with media companies to add audio recording to other apps http://nie.mn/eLvKTT »

The case for even more metrics in online journalism http://nie.mn/dZw01z »

AOL/HuffPo deal puts Arianna in charge of all editorial content. Also MovieFone and Mapquest http://nie.mn/hMqILp »

 
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