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April 25, 2011, noon

A great resource on new Latin American journalism

You may not know about Revista, the magazine about Latin America produced by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies here at Harvard. It covers a range of issues relating to the region, from architecture to violence to dance.

But if you’re at all interested in contemporary Latin American journalism, you should check out the Spring/Summer 2011 issue, which is all about the subject. Check out the full table of contents, but here are a few pieces — all written by past Nieman Fellows — that stood out to me:

Raul Penaranda on why he started a newspaper with an iPad-driven business idea

Monica Almeida on press censorship in Ecuador

Alfredo Corchado on the personal risks taken by reporters in Mexico

Graciela Mochofsky with an overview of recent innovation in Latin American journalism

— Juanita León on online journalism in Colombia

What’s remarkable about this group (if I may brag about our Nieman Fellows for a bit) is that so many of them are proving to be among the region’s most important journalism innovators, starting their own news outlets in what has sometimes been criticized as a conservative media culture: Penaranda with Página Siete, Mochofsky with el puercoespín, and León with La Silla Vacía. Give the issue a read.

Joshua Benton is the senior writer and former director of Nieman Lab. You can reach him via email (joshua_benton@harvard.edu) or Twitter DM (@jbenton).
POSTED     April 25, 2011, noon
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