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Why won’t some people pay for news?
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April 5, 2011, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: AOL fires freelancers, Examiner.com pays more for quality

Hyperlocal network Examiner.com will use incentive pay to make content, um, not content-farmy http://nie.mn/gHOAbj »

NY Post issues correction after incorrectly attributing crazy quote to Toni Braxton (but doesn’t say who said it) http://nie.mn/et8qh7 »

Elisabeth Murdoch makes a cool £153 million selling her TV production company to her dad http://nie.mn/f4dkpH »

Mark Oppenheimer: Save NPR, kill PBS http://nie.mn/hkT4T0 »

The FCC reboots its website and its mission. @digiphile previews: http://nie.mn/h09vBi »

An interview with David Plotz, “founding father of online journalism,” on @Slate at 15 http://nie.mn/elBmwl »

After switching to Facebook Comments, TechCrunch saw commenting plummet. BUT: http://nie.mn/gP0G7I »

Matt Thompson: 19 ways to promote your content without being smarmy http://nie.mn/gzJqWb »

AOL fires freelancers, Huff Post doesn’t pay, and Paul Carr approves http://nie.mn/ek6lwF »

 
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