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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
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May 24, 2011, 6:30 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Twitter buys Tweetdeck, Gawker pageviews come back, 1 in 3 Americans don’t have broadband

An FCC report says 26 million Americans lack broadband access; 1 in 3 Americans doesn’t subscribe http://nie.mn/lXwwgG »

Soon-to-be Duke grad @christine_hall really wants you to hire her http://nie.mn/mA6ihF via @simonowens »

An MIT startup records television and, simultaneously, the things being said about the programs and ads online http://nie.mn/kUyuuv »

Pardon his hokeyness, but John Horgan is upbeat about the future of science journalism http://nie.mn/lP55EW »

Congratulations to the Nieman Foundation’s Class of 2012! http://nie.mn/ipgnsr »

RT @nicknotned: Gawker Media’s weekly pageviews at 114m — back to level before redesign. http://bit.ly/kbftVM »

Inside the campaign to release Al-Jazeera English journalist Dorothy Parvaz (Nieman Fellow ’09) http://nie.mn/lFOr3a »

It’s officially almost official: Twitter is reported to have acquired TweetDeck for $40 million http://nie.mn/jZLR58 »

“Today’s e-book power buyer—someone who buys an e-book at least once a week—is a 44-year-old woman who loves romance” http://nie.mn/mCxfif »

The NYT’s @lheron revealed the paper’s social-media policy: “Don’t be stupid.” http://nie.mn/mbKitX »

 
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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
Genius (née Rap Genius) wanted to “annotate the world” and give your content a giant comment section you can’t control. Now it can’t pay back its investors.
This study shows how people reason their way through echo chambers — and what might guide them out
“You really don’t know whether this person making a good-sounding argument is really smart, is really educated, or whether they’re just reading off something that they read on Twitter.”
Misinformation is a global problem. One of the solutions might work across continents too.
Plus: What Africa’s top fact-checkers are doing to combat false beliefs about Covid-19.