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Here’s how The New York Times tested blockchain to help you identify faked photos on your timeline
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June 29, 2011, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: A story meeting for the community, an iPad app for Oprah

The Register Citizen is inviting community members to participate in daily “online story meetings” http://nie.mn/lqjfw9 »

MT @jonathanstray: The Johnny Cash project: Best Internet-enabled collaborative artwork I’ve yet seen. http://www.thejohnnycashproject.com/ »

.@AP has reached an agreement with the Korea Central News Agency to establish a news bureau in Pyongyang http://nie.mn/k1wWKP »

Seems @Biz is not all that happy about Twitter appearing to be buddies with the State Department http://nie.mn/iQrnbS »

When Jill Abramson takes over the NYT this fall, is holding onto staff her first priority? http://nie.mn/jqjfW9 »

Oprah’s book club is making the leap to digital in a new edition of the O Magazine iPad app http://nie.mn/lNI1cX »

If a league lockout happens, NBA.com won’t be able to to show videos or photos of players http://nie.mn/jTs9ar »

Village Voice staffers plan to continue to publish on Tumblr if they have to strike http://nie.mn/kE7OuM »

 
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Here’s how The New York Times tested blockchain to help you identify faked photos on your timeline
“What we saw was a tendency to accept almost all images at first glance, regardless of subject area.”
Public infrastructure isn’t just bridges and water mains: Here’s an argument for extending the concept to digital spaces
“Our solutions cannot be limited to asking these platforms to do a better job of meeting their civic obligations — we need to consider what technologies we want and need for digital media to have a productive role in democratic societies.”
This former HBO executive is trying to use dramatic techniques to highlight the injustice in criminal justice
And hopefully to make some good TV along the way. Kary Antholis’ site Crime Story uses “a much more thematic, character-driven way of exploring these stories than how traditional media might pursue.”