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Oct. 14, 2011, 11:30 a.m.

Introducing Fuego for mobile, with an extra for iPhone users

It’s the best way to stay up to date with the future of news while you’re on the go.

Today we’ve got a little treat for smartphone users: Fuego for Mobile.

Fuego is, of course, our heat-seeking Twitter bot, our tool that amalgamates the best and most interesting stories the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about on Twitter and presents them to you for quick reading. It’s like being on Twitter all day, without having to be on Twitter all day.

Fuego practically cries out for mobile, because what it gives you — a quick dose of what people are buzzing about — is exactly what you’re looking for when you’ve got a few quick minutes to spare, phone in hand. But until now, the layout of Fuego was designed with laptops, desktops, and tablets in mind.

Now, if you go to niemanlab.org/fuego/ on a phone, it should automatically redirect to /fuegomobile/ and an optimized view for smaller screens. (If you want to switch back to desktop view, there’s a link in the footer of the mobile version.)

Better yet, for iPhone and iPod touch users, we’ve set up Fuego so that it can be installed as a home screen app on your device. That way, Fuego will always be one tap away, and Fuego will live as its own app, separate from your Safari tabs. You’ll be prompted to do so when Fuego launches; check out the accompanying video to see more.

We hope you’re enjoying Fuego as much as we are; we’ve got more plans for it, which you’ll hear more about in the coming weeks.

POSTED     Oct. 14, 2011, 11:30 a.m.
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