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Most people on Twitter don’t live in political echo chambers — but mostly because they don’t care enough to bother building one
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Archives: February 2018

“The kinds of things that I often see could literally be stopped by one person. I mean: 4chan trending on Google during the Las Vegas shooting? How that even happened, I have no idea, but I do know that one person could have stopped that.”
“How many photographs have crossed your screen today? Dozens? Hundreds? How many have you looked at? How many did you really see?”
Like Circa before it, The Guardian aims to atomize a big breaking story into its individual parts — and then be smart about showing you the right ones at the right time.
Plus: Anchor relaunches (and where are we with social audio?), a McDonald’s podcast is an utterly fascinating artifact, and more media pariahs move to podcasts (this time, it’s Logan Paul).
Gothamist is back (yay!), but DNAinfo is not (boo!). Here’s what we’ve learned about the public radio bid to bring the site back.
“We don’t see AMP Stories as a fun side project. We believe it will become a core part of our toolbox,” says The Washington Post’s lead product manager.
“For us, this is a way to let people read and ask questions at their own pace, instead of having them read through long screens of text. Often people aren’t engaged in stories because they haven’t had the right context.”