Nieman Foundation at Harvard
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Archives: June 2019

The Times knows its editors’ judgment of what’s important is one of its critical selling points. But in order to surface more than a sliver of its journalism each day, it’s now willing to respond to readers’ interests in a much bigger way.
Cost-cutting by newspaper chains has moved up print deadlines that even the biggest stories can’t make the paper if they happen after 6 p.m. That’s what happened in Nashville this week when Vanderbilt won the College World Series.
Plus: A fake news game that seems to inoculate players against fake news.
“Given the dearth of empirical studies about news audience behavior in the world’s largest democracy, our study provides a benchmark for future comparative research on news consumption across platforms and across countries to build on.”
“We’re living in an age of journalism where people want to help each other and are prioritizing collaboration over competition. We want to seize on that in a way that ensures no matter who is in the newsroom there’s still a mechanism for them to use this.”
“This represents five full-time correspondents working in different parts of the world, as well as at least five freelancers each month.”
The Journal went on a quest to identify the user actions — an app download, an article share, repeat reading of a particular reporter’s stories — that can turn a new subscriber into a loyal one. Then it turned that knowledge into churn-reducing action.
Cable news is growing, local TV news is declining, and network news is roughly flat.
“If the publisher ecosystem is healthy, then SmartNews is healthy. That’s going to be an important thrust going forward.”
“It’s not a science story for us here in South Florida. It’s not some kind of theoretical exploration. It’s real. It’s what many in our community experience in their neighborhoods.”