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The Boston Globe revisits an infamous murder — and confronts its own sins along the way
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The Boston Globe revisits an infamous murder — and confronts its own sins along the way
“They’ve never said, ‘We got that wrong.'”
By Sarah Scire
How Black women get their political news matters for this election
A new study investigates the ways Black women use social media, TV news, and other sources to engage with politics.
By Nadia Brown, Camille Burge and Christine Slaughter
Is The New York Times’ newsroom just a bunch of Ivy Leaguers? (Kinda, sorta.)
They’re not a majority, based on a new look at education data, but they are wildly overrepresented.
By Joshua Benton
San Francisco Chronicle tries an AI chatbot — er, Chowbot — for food recs
Chowbot is the Chronicle’s “first real foray into audience-facing AI.”
By Sarah Scire
With elections looming worldwide, here’s how to identify and investigate AI audio deepfakes
“They are easier and cheaper to create than deepfake videos, and there are fewer contextual clues to detect with the naked eye.”
By Rowan Philp
Google tests removing the News tab from search results
The News filter disappearing from Google search results for some users this week won’t help publishers sleep any easier.
By Sarah Scire
Wealthier, urban Americans have access to more local news
But roughly half of U.S. counties have only one news outlet or less.
By Sarah Stonbely
A new study looks at the positive things that can happen when journalism and comedy intersect
“When I asked people ‘Are you journalists?’ they would say no. But if I asked them ‘Is what is what you do journalistic?’ they say yes, of course.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
“We’ve really worked hard not to ever have a pivot at The New York Times”: A.G. Sulzberger on AI, local news, and that Trump bump
“Never get comfortable; always assume that the world is conspiring to take down the industry and that we will have to move heaven and earth to overcome those forces to blaze a path forward for quality journalism.”
By Joshua Benton
The Boston Globe revisits an infamous murder — and confronts its own sins along the way
“They’ve never said, ‘We got that wrong.'”
By Sarah Scire
How Black women get their political news matters for this election
A new study investigates the ways Black women use social media, TV news, and other sources to engage with politics.
Is The New York Times’ newsroom just a bunch of Ivy Leaguers? (Kinda, sorta.)
They’re not a majority, based on a new look at education data, but they are wildly overrepresented.
What We’re Reading
Slate Magazine / Scott Nover
How Semafor media reporter Maxwell Tani became the go-to guy for news about media layoffs
“As messed up as it is, you could write every single day on this beat about how bad things are at different media companies and choose your company of the week. After doing that for years and years, I think that while it’s an important and necessary part of coverage, I want to challenge myself to try to diversify the types of stories that I’m doing.”
The Salt Lake Tribune / Lauren Gustus
The Salt Lake Tribune says “it’s increasingly difficult” to report on how Utah lawmakers are serving the people who elected them
“Gov. Spencer Cox has already signed legislation making elected officials and lawmakers’ work calendars a secret. Other bills, if signed, will pay for private companies to scrape lawmakers’ public information from the web and mean you won’t know how much water Utah wants to buy from other states and what it will cost taxpayers. I could go on.”
Washington Post / Erik Wemple
Settlement in Japanese court ends an embarrassing episode for The Atlantic
The case “helped to furnish a useful lesson in how U.S. media companies fare when they cannot fall back on the ironclad legal protections they enjoy in the United States. Along with a window into an embarrassing fact-checking breakdown at a top American media outlet.”
Associated Press Sports Editors / Naila-Jean Meyers
APSE creates the Billie Jean King Award to honor coverage of women’s sports
“Billie Jean King has been a champion for gender equality in sports for more than 60 years, and creating a prestigious award in her name specifically for coverage of women’s sports – I’ve already started affectionately referring to it as The Billie — elevates the great work being done and incentivizes this coverage in a way that is commensurate with the popularity and growth of women’s sports. It is time for writers who are consistently and expertly telling the stories of female athletes to have an award of their own.”
The Washington Post / Kim Bellware
The Marshall Project, Pulitzer-winning nonprofit criminal justice newsroom, to unionize
“The Marshall Project Guild will be part of the NewsGuild of New York, CWA Local 31003, and as a ‘wall-to-wall’ union will represent about 50 staffers on the editorial and business sides. The union, which has the support of more than 80 percent of the staff, is receiving voluntary recognition.”
Vanity Fair / Charlotte Klein
New York Times launches leak investigation over report on its Israel-Gaza coverage
“It’s highly unusual for the Times to conduct a leak investigation, with multiple staffers saying this is the first such internal probe they can recall taking place. ‘It’s not something we do,’ said one. ‘That kind of witch hunt is really concerning.'”
The Verge / Kevin Nguyen
TinyLetter, in memoriam
“TinyLetter has languished over the past decade. But it’s hard not to be a little sad when even a humble little service is sunsetted, especially one that contributed to such a strong and particular moment of internet culture. How many platforms had a distinct voice?”
The Washington Post / Drew Harwell
Trump Media co-founders sue company, alleging a scheme to dilute shares
“The case could complicate a long-delayed bid by the owner of Truth Social to go public — and deliver former president Donald Trump a financial lifeline.”
The Intercept / Jeremy Scahill, Ryan Grim, and Daniel Boguslaw
The story behind The New York Times’ October 7 exposé
“At every turn, when The New York Times reporters ran into obstacles confirming tips, they turned to anonymous Israeli officials or witnesses who’d already been interviewed repeatedly in the press. Months after setting off on their assignment, the reporters found themselves exactly where they had begun, relying overwhelmingly on the word of Israeli officials, soldiers, and Zaka workers to substantiate their claim that more than 30 bodies of women and girls were discovered with signs of sexual abuse.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Mathew Ingram
Indictment of Florida journalist raises troubling questions
“One of the unfortunate aspects of the U.S. attorney’s case, [Tim Burke’s lawyer Mark] Rasch said, is that it implies that unless someone works for an outlet like the New York Times or Wall Street Journal, ‘the government treats you as if you’re not a journalist. And that has got to stop.'”
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