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After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
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After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
“We will all have to adjust to a new workflow. If it is a bottleneck, it will be a failure.”
By Sarah Scire
“Impossible to approach the reporting the way I normally would”: How Rachel Aviv wrote that New Yorker story on Lucy Letby
“So much of the media coverage — and the trial itself — started at the point at which we’ve determined that [Lucy] Letby is an evil murderer; all her texts, notes, and movements are then viewed through that lens.”
By Sarah Scire
Increasingly stress-inducing subject lines helped The Intercept surpass its fundraising goal
“We feel like we really owe it to our readers to be honest about the stakes and to let them know that we truly cannot do this work without them.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
In an increasingly fractured Europe, this project is betting on one-on-one talks as a way to find common ground
“We get requests from all over the world, and everyone says that their country is experiencing unprecedented levels of polarization or a breakdown in social cohesion.”
By Eduardo Suárez
After The Messenger’s collapse, Jimmy Finkelstein seems to be itching for a do-over
“May I suggest to any potential investors just setting your money on fire instead? Faster, less traumatic, same outcome.”
By Joshua Benton
Apple News adds a new original game to boost News+ subscriptions
The news aggregator app has focused on puzzles and games that are “more welcoming to newcomers.”
By Sarah Scire
People who got off Facebook for 6 pivotal weeks in 2020 may have been less likely to vote for Trump
“We do think our results can inform readers’ priors about the potential effects of social media in the final weeks of high-profile national elections.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How NPR and Floodlight teamed up to uncover fossil fuel “news mirages” across the country
“It’s information. But it’s not news.”
By Neel Dhanesha
This journalism professor made a NYC chatbot in minutes. It actually worked.
“The step that we need to make as a society is moving from, ‘This came from a machine, it must be correct,’ to, if I’m talking to a friend of mine who says something crazy, ‘I need to double check that, I need to cross reference it to make sure that it is accurate.'”
By Colin Lecher, The Markup
For the first time, two Pulitzer winners disclosed using AI in their reporting
Awarded investigative stories are increasingly relying on machine learning, whether covering Chicago police negligence or Israeli weapons in Gaza
By Andrew Deck
“We’re there to cover what’s happening”: How student journalists are covering campus protests
“We don’t come in when there’s something crazy happening and then leave when it’s over. This is just what we do all the time. And I really hope that makes people trust us more as a newspaper.”
By Sophie Culpepper
Screenshots are one big winner of Meta’s news ban in Canada
“We observe a dramatic increase in posts containing screenshots of Canadian news stories in the post-ban period.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
This year’s Pulitzer Prizes were a coming-out party for online media — and a marker of local newspapers’ decline
For the first time ever, more online news sites produced Pulitzer finalists than newspapers did.
By Joshua Benton
Most Americans say local news is important. But they’re consuming less of it.
Just 15% of Americans paid or gave money to a local news source in the past year, according to new research from the Pew-Knight Initiative.
By Sophie Culpepper
After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
“We will all have to adjust to a new workflow. If it is a bottleneck, it will be a failure.”
By Sarah Scire
“Impossible to approach the reporting the way I normally would”: How Rachel Aviv wrote that New Yorker story on Lucy Letby
“So much of the media coverage — and the trial itself — started at the point at which we’ve determined that [Lucy] Letby is an evil murderer; all her texts, notes, and movements are then viewed through that lens.”
Increasingly stress-inducing subject lines helped The Intercept surpass its fundraising goal
“We feel like we really owe it to our readers to be honest about the stakes and to let them know that we truly cannot do this work without them.”
What We’re Reading
Washington Post / Laura Wagner
Journalists sue Chicago Tribune owner alleging pay discrimination
“According to the plaintiffs, an independent analysis of newsroom salaries found women are paid 10 percent less than male counterparts and Black journalists are paid 10 percent less than White colleagues doing similar work. Black female journalists are paid 20 percent less than their White male counterparts.”
Latin American Journalism Review / Felippe Aníbal
Underwater, Correio do Povo covers the human tragedy of the floods in southern Brazil
“You have to worry about your work, about your mission to inform. But we can’t produce more victims. We can’t put people at risk. Life is more important than anything right now,” editor-in-chief Telmo Flor said. “It’s not just news. Things are also happening to us. I have three teams that went to cover the countryside and they’re stranded, unable to get home.”
Digiday / Kayleigh Barber
Publishers’ Q1 earnings show promise, but also room for improvement
“For nearly all of the five public publishers included in this report, digital advertising grew in the first quarter of 2024, with the exception of BuzzFeed. Digital subscriptions revenue also fared well in the first three months of the year for the three publishers that report that revenue line: Gannett, Dow Jones and The New York Times. Meanwhile, licensing and commerce revenue were two boons for Dotdash Meredith in the quarter as well. “
The Verge / Alex Heath
Google and OpenAI are racing to rewire the internet
“Google and OpenAI are working toward the same goal here: collapsing the traditional notion of a search engine into a conversational AI interface. If this is successfully achieved, both believe it can be the interface that fully absorbs how people navigate the internet. In essence, it’s a race to see if Google Search becomes more like ChatGPT before ChatGPT can become more like Google Search.”
Fast Company / Steven Melendez
Ex-Markup CEO Nabiha Syed wants to bring joy and creativity back to the internet in her new role as Mozilla’s executive director
“Mozilla is one of those brands that I think I knew about it from my early internet consciousness,” Syed says. “And it is one of those brands that has this history of putting people before profit and creativity before control.”
Latin American Journalism Review / César López Linares
Central American editors discuss strategies for preserving wellbeing and safety of newsrooms in hostile environments
“Nothing works if there is no trust between editors and reporters. If you’re a reporter and don’t trust your editor, don’t go to any risky place. And if you’re an editor and you don’t trust your reporter, or you don’t know how to assess his own security, don’t let him go.”
International News Media Association / Paula Felps
With major elections ahead, what should news media companies do about paywalls?
“When important news breaks, audiences turn to trusted news brands to get the facts. In the past, this has translated into subscription revenue, and many companies may be looking forward to the crucial role of the elections in boosting subscriptions.”
The New York Times / Jim Rutenberg and Michael M. Grynbaum
How MSNBC’s leftward tilt delivers ratings, and complications for local NBC stations
“NBC’s traditional political journalists have cycled between rancor and resignation that the cable network’s partisanship — a regular target of Mr. Trump — will color perceptions of their straight news reporting. Local NBC stations between the coasts have demanded, again and again, that executives in New York do more to preserve NBC’s nonpartisan brand, lest MSNBC’s blue-state bent alienate their red-state viewers.”
Drilled / Molly Taft
How oil companies manipulate journalists
“These documents also reveal what coverage these fossil-fuel companies are pleased to receive, the kinds of reporters they try to curry favor with, and the ways they try to manipulate journalists. They also show how Big Oil could actually get the more pliant media it so desperately wants.”
Gothamist / Jon Campbell
New York’s $90 million tax break for local news outlets leaves out TV and nonprofits
“The state’s economic development agency will be tasked with writing regulations for the new program, which will determine, among other things, whether for-profit, digital-only outlets will be included. Meanwhile, those who pushed for the tax credit are still trying to figure out whether changes can or should be made to make the law apply to a broader array of media outlets that people rely on for local news.”
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