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Worldwide, news publishers face a “platform reset”
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Worldwide, news publishers face a “platform reset”
Some findings from RISJ’s 2024 Digital News Report.
By Nieman Lab Staff
The strange history of white journalists trying to “become” Black
“To believe that the richness of Black identity can be understood through a temporary costume trivializes the lifelong trauma of racism. It turns the complexity of Black life into a stunt.”
By Alisha Gaines
Business Insider’s owner signed a huge OpenAI deal. ChatGPT still won’t credit the site’s biggest scoops
“We are…deeply worried that despite this partnership, OpenAI may be downplaying rather than elevating our works,” Business Insider’s union wrote in a letter to management.
By Andrew Deck
How Newslaundry worked with its users to make its journalism more accessible
“If you’re doing it, do it properly. Don’t just add a few widgets, or overlay products and embeds, and call yourself accessible.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How YouTube’s recommendations pull you away from news
Plus: News participation is declining, online and offline; making personal phone calls could help with digital-subscriber churn; and partly automated news videos seem to work with audiences.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Apple brings free call recording and transcription to iPhones; journalists rejoice
“There are decades where nothing happens, and there are weeks when decades happen.”
By Joshua Benton
What can The Wall Street Journal’s new ad campaign tell us about its future?
The new brand campaign is aimed at younger versions of existing Journal readers. The various “It’s Your Business” ads center some of the newsroom’s edgier and more evergreen journalism.
By Sarah Scire
“Neither feast nor famine”: In 2023, nonprofit news continued to grow — but the audience picture is more complicated
While the sector is still growing, that growth is slowing, by some metrics. And audience data for 2023 shows that across all outlets surveyed, average monthly web traffic fell.
By Sophie Culpepper
Scenes from the trial of Ozy’s Carlos Watson
Ozy’s Instagram account is calling for supporters to pack the courtroom as “Justice Watchers.”
By Joshua Benton
Does curiosity make you read more hard news? How about anxiety?
A new study finds that certain personality traits might make you exaggerate — or underestimate — how much political news you consume.
By Joshua Benton
Worldwide, news publishers face a “platform reset”
Some findings from RISJ’s 2024 Digital News Report.
By Nieman Lab Staff
The strange history of white journalists trying to “become” Black
“To believe that the richness of Black identity can be understood through a temporary costume trivializes the lifelong trauma of racism. It turns the complexity of Black life into a stunt.”
Business Insider’s owner signed a huge OpenAI deal. ChatGPT still won’t credit the site’s biggest scoops
“We are…deeply worried that despite this partnership, OpenAI may be downplaying rather than elevating our works,” Business Insider’s union wrote in a letter to management.
What We’re Reading
Current / Austin Fuller
Growing costs and falling sponsorship are fueling the waves of layoffs in public media
” Current has tracked more than 400 jobs lost to layoffs or buyouts since March 2023, including at operations as different as NPR, Chicago Public Media, GBH in Boston and WBHM in Birmingham, Ala.”
Knight Foundation / Issie Lapowsky
Translating research on digital media into policy and practice
“The clearest evidence that journalists consider this research to be vital is their shared concern about rising political attacks against researchers in this space … ‘If those researchers are being muzzled because of these lawsuits,’ says [Craig] Silverman of ProPublica, “that’s going to have an impact for journalists, as well.'” (The Stanford Internet Observatory, highlighted in this report, is being dismantled.)
The Washington Post / Isaac Stanley-Becker, Sarah Ellison, Greg Miller, and Aaron C. Davis
Incoming Post editor tied to self-described “thief” who claimed role in his reporting
“At The Post and other major American news organizations, the use of deceptive tactics in pursuit of news stories violates core ethics policies. In Britain, ‘blagging’ — using misrepresentation to dupe others into revealing confidential information — has been a known feature of a certain brand of tabloid journalism, especially before a public reckoning over press ethics began in 2011.”
Popular Information / Judd Legum
Sinclair Broadcast Group floods local news websites with deceptive articles about Biden’s mental fitness
“On June 6, Sinclair also devoted an entire article to amplifying the right-wing fabrication that Biden soiled himself on stage. The URL for the article even includes the word ‘pooping’…Each of these crass political smears masquerading as journalism was syndicated to at least 86 local news websites owned by Sinclair.”
The New York Times / John Branch
In a digital age, high-end outdoors magazines are thriving in print
“The screen experience is so reductionist,” said Stephen Casimiro, a former editor of Powder and National Geographic Adventure and founder and publisher of Adventure Journal. “It just flattens the world, so that a Pulitzer Prize-winning story feels the same as spam. Some things deserve better.”
BBC / Thomas Germain
AI took their jobs. Now they get paid to make it sound human
“Now, people like Miller are finding themselves being asked to team up with the same robots that are stealing their jobs to give the algorithms a bit of humanity – a hidden army making AI seem better than it really is.”
Wired / Jason Parham
The Anderson Cooper of Black Twitter believes journalism can survive influencers
“I don’t want to bring attention to everything because there’s so much engagement bait online now,” Phil Lewis says. “What I try to avoid doing is lighting something on fire.”
Defector / Owen Lewis
The “Longform” podcast told the story of an industry
“If you want to learn about writers’ processes, it’s the place to go. If you want to hear rejection stories and tales of someone taking a chance on writers, it’s the place to go. A single Longform episode can invoke fierce inspiration or great sorrow, sometimes both within an hour.”
The Guardian / Ari Saperstein
Accessible and “a pleasure to read”: How Apple’s podcast transcriptions came to be
“Apple’s journey to podcast transcripts started with the expansion of a different feature: indexing. It’s a common origin story at a number of tech companies like Amazon and Yahoo – what begins as a search tool evolves into a full transcription initiative. Apple first deployed software that could identify specific words in a podcast back in 2018.”
TechCrunch / Aisha Malik
YouTube is experimenting with Notes, a crowdsourced feature that lets users add context to videos
“YouTube is introducing a new experimental feature that will allow viewers to add “Notes” to provide more context and information under videos…If the feature sounds similar, it’s because it follows the same concept as Community Notes on X (formerly Twitter).”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.